Do I Need a Personal Brand When Promoting MOBE Products?

Do I Need a Personal Brand When Promoting MOBE Products

MOBE Products: Branding is vital to a business. Your brand is what sets you apart from competition and makes you recognizable to your customers. A brand also gives you placement in the market and sets consumer’s expectations of you.

As an affiliate marketer, you promote the MOBE affiliate program and MOBE products. This can get you wondering if you should develop your own brand aside from being a MOBE consultant, or whether you even need one.

It’s A Business

Affiliate marketing is a business like any other, hence you need a brand for your business. Your business if different in the sense that you are advertising MOBE products, alongside other MOBE consultants and other people promoting business training products for other affiliate programs. In such a competitive market, you need to give people a reason to choose you, hence you need to sell your personal image.

Recognition

Affiliate marketing is an increasingly competitive industry. It is vital that you stand out from the masses if you want to make success of your business. When you have a strong brand image, people will be coming to you to look for products. They recognize you as an industry leader, and whenever they need a solution within your niche, you will be foremost in their mind. For example, if you establish yourself as an expert in business training, small businesses in your audience may contact you when they need advice on a business problem, and you could offer them suitable MOBE products.

Authority

Having a strong personal brand gives you authority. Customers start recognizing you as an expert in your subject field, and are willing to listen to you. Your audience trust you and the information you provide, so you become an influential factor in their purchase decision. They will be more willing to click your links and buy.

Conclusion

Every business needs a brand image, and you should realize that your ‘work’ with the MOBE affiliate program is indeed a business. As the business representative, you have a responsibility of creating a personal brand that makes your business stand out.

Mobe Review :Make a Pitch Presentation

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Mobe Review for financing – A lot of entrepreneurs have amazing startup ideas that have great potential. These are the kind of great ideas that actually addresses a need in the market and have more chances to succeed. Ideas that interest investors and inspire them to call you for a pitch. Unfortunately, for most, it only ends there, with the pitch. They fail to impress investors when pitching and end up losing a great opportunity.

The problem usually isn’t with the prepared pitch. Sometimes, its the presentation. A lot of startup founders have little experience in public speaking and presenting. Many have a problem with explaining their ideas well in front of an audience, especially if it’s of technical matters where the audience happens to be largely non-technical.

To present your ideas to investors in a style that will get you funded, you first need to be able to get a hold of their attention. Use the first few minutes to earn their attention for the next 20 minutes, which in turn will make them want to hear you out more. In those first few minutes, explain your idea in a simple and compelling manner that will make the investors want to partner with you. Use your presence on stage to assure them that not only is your idea worth funding, but you are also a solid character they can do business with.

Below are a few effective tips and tactics that will help you present your next pitch straight to funding.

Connect with Your Audience

The best way to present your pitch is by addressing your investors’ interests and connecting with them on an emotional level. Tell them an inspirational and relatable story that shows passion in your idea. This will make you stand out because your cause is attainable and shows promise.

Know Your Product

Emotional appeal can only get you so far. You must also prove that you know what you are talking about. You can’t convince anyone that your product is worth investing in if you seem unsure of it. Study every aspect related to the product prior to the presentation. Cover all the angles your investors might look at, and understand them well instead of just memorizing. Be ready to answer all sorts of questions in a detailed and knowledgeable manner. You will have only a short period of time to convince investors that your product is a “must-have,” and that leaves no time for mumbling and scratching your head.

Be Audible

There is no use of you speaking if your audience can’t hear you. Keep in mind that your voice, speech, and words must be clear enough to communicate your business proposal well. If investors can’t understand you, they’ll lose interest by the very first minute; and once you lose their interest, you are likely not to get it back.

Use Common Language

Chances are your possible investors might not even be in your business niche nor have the expertise you do. They will not understand the jargons and terminologies that might be common in your industry, and the last thing you want to do is alienate them. Use simple language, terms and common concepts they will be familiar with to make sure they clearly understand your pitch.

Be Structured

Audiences find a presentation that is all over the place very annoying, and investors don’t have time to try and piece together your points. Have a structured flow that explains the current market need, how your startup satisfies that need, and give proof that your startup solution is feasible. Do not bombard them with endless PowerPoint presentations and spreadsheets. Be precise and simple, about 10 slides will do, and make every slide count.

Provide an Exit Strategy

Investors are putting their money on your ideas in order to make profit. They will only provide financial backing where they see potential to make money. You need a strong conclusion that informs investors how they will get their money back. An exit strategy is what you need and it should be practical to show investors that the investment will result in profit and they will benefit from your idea.

The exit strategy is an essential part of a pitch which many entrepreneurs fail to propose to investors. Omitting this won’t make them see the benefits of your startup and they won’t venture to look further in your direction—so don’t forget to include this.

It is hard enough to get a meeting with investors; so when you have an opportunity to pitch, it is vital that you take advantage and make the best out of it. Pitching will always be a daunting task no matter how many times you do it, but with an amazing idea, a great business plan and lots of preparation, you’ll have a better chance of impressing the investors. When preparing for a pitch, always remember the above points so you could wow investors into giving you the financial backing you need to start or expand your business.

Matt Lloyd Mobe Tips: ‘Freemium’ Business

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Matt Lloyd Mobe Tips:The freemium business model, which blends the elements of “free” and “premium,” is gaining popularity among business owners. They are leveraging the concept to draw larger numbers of customers than they could if they didn’t have a free digital product to offer upfront.

In some cases, this strategy works great. In others, it’s a complete disaster. So, how do you know if freemium is right for your business?

Origins

To best answer this question, you should consider how the business model evolved.

Matt Lloyd Mobe Tips: Back in the day, the freemium model was pretty much only used by tech companies. Entry-level IT solutions, free apps, music services, VOIP offerings such as Skype—the whole idea was to offer an easy point of entry to the masses, with a plan to upsell a certain percentage of free users on the backend, thereby ensuring profitability.

Over time, the pricing model morphed a bit and expanded outside the tech realm. While marketing purists may take issue with applying the term freemium to other free content-driven mechanisms, such as inbound and content marketing offers, the result is largely the same: using a free product or service to attract customers who, hopefully, will pay for the premium upgrade.

This makes sense up to a point because the power of a freebie stems from having a high quality digital product that can be easily duplicated at low or no cost.

But there are two key factors that will determine whether or not the freemium model is good for your business:

  1. Your free product’s potential reach, and
  2. Your capacity for offering complementary products that can lock in profits

Reach

Obviously, the greater your free product’s reach, the more prospects and customers you’ll draw. And this larger influx should translate into a larger potential market for your upsell products—because the more people who know about these offerings, the greater the chances that they’ll buy them.

Upsell

Unfortunately, this is where the wheels can come off the wagon, even for tech companies that should know better.

Case in point: Box, a cloud storage file sync and share company. (Note: Box is the example of choice here because it’s publicly traded and there’s plenty of information available about it. But you could probably insert the more familiar Dropbox, which is privately held, and arrive at a similar conclusion.)

Other Uses

Matt Lloyd Mobe Tips: Of course, that’s not to say the freemium model doesn’t deliver. In many cases, it yields outstanding results. Your challenges when adopting such a model will usually come down to determining what should be offered for free, and what to do if your initial assessment misses the mark.

If you fail to draw in new users, for example, it’s probably a sign that your free offerings are not compelling enough, so you’d want to provide more (or better) free features.

On the other hand, if you’re gaining traffic but no one’s paying to upgrade, that could be a sign that your free offerings are too robust and you need to pare back.

As a business owner, it’s up to you to determine both your customers’ expectations and your willingness and ability to supply free and premium offerings that meet those expectations. To help stay on track, ask yourself the following six questions:

  1. What am I willing to provide for free?
  2. Am I communicating the value of my premium offer effectively?
  3. Do I know my ideal conversion rate?
  4. Do I fully grasp my product’s conversion life cycle?
  5. Are my freebie takers spreading the word about my product?
  6. Is my freemium model driving innovation in my business?

Whether or not the freemium model is right for your business will depend upon a number of factors. If you let the six questions above serve as your guide, you should be able to determine if this model will lead to sustainable success or if you should consider another approach.

Matt Lloyd Ideas :Lots of Clicks but No Opt-Ins?

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Matt Lloyd Training Ideas – In the scheme of things, plenty of clicks and no opt-ins isn’t such a bad problem to have. It’s a good indication that at least your ad is working. This narrows down what the possible problems are and how to fix them.

Consistency

Mobe Matt Lloyd Training Ideas – People like and want consistency. They want what they see and are more or less disappointed when what they get does not look like what was advertised to them. This was illustrated really well in Falling Down, a pretty dark American movie from the early nineties.

In it, Michael Douglas plays a man who has lost his family and his job and finally, it seems, his mind. In one scene, he goes into a burger place and orders lunch at gunpoint. When it arrives, it’s a “sorry, miserable, squashed thing”—nothing like the plump, juicy burger on the menu board.

I love movies. There was a time in my life, back in 2008 and 2009, when I watched a lot of them—two a night sometimes. Often, they were films I’d never heard of. I would watch a trailer and if it looked good, I’d download or stream the movie.

Sometimes, I’d bail out by half-hour into the film when I realized the trailer was more entertaining than the actual movie. Inconsistency.

The same kind of “bail out” can happen with your clicks and opt-ins. As an online marketer, you can create problems for yourself when you fail to maintain consistency throughout your sales funnel. This can show up one or more ways:

Copy: Your ad copy doesn’t correspond to your landing page copy. This applies strongly to ad headlines or email subject lines. If your ad headline says “Make Easy Money in Your Spare Time” and your landing page headline is “Free Ebook Shows You How to Generate Leads,” there’s a disconnection there. They’re two different things. People will quickly lose confidence and click away. Ensure there’s a consistency between them and, when unsure, make them identical.

Look and feel: The company colors, type font, images, tone of the copy, etc. are as important as the headline. For instance, don’t create a brand new ad that links to an old landing page with last year’s design, an outdated logo, etc.

Ensure each part of your sales funnel is consistent with the other parts.

Free and Valuable

In most cases, what people are trying to do is generate leads from whom they can promote their paid offers to. You can consider anyone who gives you some degree of contact information as a lead. But they don’t just give up their email address for nothing.

You’ve got to give them something of value. At MOBE, we give them access to a library of videos in which I answer the most pressing business questions new entrepreneurs and online marketers ask, updated almost daily. This is our “lead magnet.”

Your lead magnet may be a free e-book, report, e-course, consultation, or other valuable free item or service.

To know what’s valuable to your market, you’ve got to know your market: Who are your typical prospects? What are their deep desires? At MOBE, we know that our market is composed of people who want to work less and earn more, so we offer access to a free video that shows them how to make $1,000, $3,000, and $5,000 commissions working just 45 minutes a day.

Minimize the Risk

People don’t want to commit too much to someone they don’t know. Offering something valuable for free minimizes the risk—it’s free, after all. To minimize it even further, you’ve got to be careful with how much contact information you ask for.

For a downloadable lead magnet, people don’t mind giving their email address or their name and email. If it’s something substantial that has to be delivered by postal mail, you can ask for a mailing address. But people don’t want to risk giving too much information. So when you ask for too much information, get too personal, expect your opt-ins to go down.

This is not necessarily a bad thing. Some people use their opt-in form to prequalify their leads. For instance, top direct response copywriter Bob Bly only wants to give his free reports to prospects seeking a world-class copywriter, not to people who just want a free e-book. So, he asks a lot of questions about their copywriting needs and budget in his opt-in form.

Does It Get You Excited?

Your headlines (or email subject lines) exist to raise the reader’s curiosity and imply a benefit to them. That’s what gets them to click. But after they’ve clicked, the rest of the copy on your landing page or home page has to keep them reading, engaged, and encouraged to take action (opt-in, call you up, make a purchase, etc.).

Your offer has to be irresistible … even to you. Regardless if you wrote the copy or someone else did and it really excites you and makes you want the offer, it would probably excite others, too.

If you’re not getting opt-ins, it may just be that your offer is not exciting enough and needs to be reworded or rewritten.

Writing effective copy is an art and science anyone can learn about. There are plenty of good books out there about it and plenty of really good copywriting how-to articles on the MOBE website.